Team Fortress 2 – Meet The Classes: Support

During the last two posts I made about Team Fortress 2, I talked about the Offensive and Defensive classes, this time around I’ll be talking about the Support classes. Also known as the classes most people either don’t want to play, or get mocked about for not contributing to the team. Let’s see how true all that really is.

Medic

When two good teams fight, the team without a Medic loses. This is often repeated during games between people who have a decent understanding of the game, usually by the losing team when they don’t have anyone playing Medic. Despite this, a lot of people don’t like playing Medic, especially not in a group of inexperienced players. As a Medic, you’re only as useful as your team is. If your team sucks, then well, you might as well play a class that can impact more by himself than support others.

Teamwork really makes or breaks the Medic’s potential. You don’t want to waste an ubercharge on someone you think is going to push, when they just turn around and run after a single, less important enemy. That said, you don’t want the Medic healing you to waste an uber on you when it’s really not the time for it.

And that’s just the start of the problems you can have with less experienced players. Sticking to a single player and healing them constantly is not a good idea. No matter how many times they spam the Medic macro, it’s not worth it. If you know what you’re doing, you can keep several people alive at the same time, rather than just that one Heavy.

Also, if you’re playing Arena, and your team doesn’t have a Medic, your team doesn’t deserve to win.

Sniper

If you don’t want to be a credit to the team and prefer to stand still somewhere in the back, the Sniper is your obvious choice. Although, not really. Snipin’s a good job, mate. When it comes to defence, the Sniper is efficient, polite, and he’s got a plan to kill everyone he meets.

Perhaps before all the updates the Sniper wasn’t all that great a class, especially not a supportive one, but since the Sniper update, a good Sniper can perfectly assist a difficult push. Although the opponents will likely not appreciate that this support comes in form of him literally pissing all over them with his Jarate bottles.

I used to hate Snipers, and was completely uncapable of playing them until recently, when I realized that in some situations, it’s best not to zoom in and just shoot normally. Really, that’s all there was to it. Since that moment, I’ve been moving forward, helping players capture control points, killing people with knives,  and helping people out. With my Jarate. A product of the penis.

Despite my newfound respect for decent Snipers, I still have a deep hatred for Snipers using a Huntsman. I’ve messed around with it a few times, and I could have sworn that a lot of the instant kill shots I’ve fired off were supposed to miss their target entirely. I’ve seen videos of “incredible” Huntsman shots on YouTube, that confirm my suspicions that the hitboxes are just absurdly disproportionate. It’s really worrying when you realize the Huntsman’s arrows can get powered up by a Pyro’s flamethrower. A cool effect, sure, but powering up an already overpowered weapon? I’m not too fond of that idea at all.

Spy

Sapping your sentry. Stabbing your Heavy. Impersonating your Sniper. Sleeping with your mother. I think with that, I can drop my weapons and walk away.

The Spy is the paranoia inducing part of the team who can cloak, feign death, pass sentries without being shot, and instantly kill players up close. Despite the fact he’s often put down as a beginner character, I found him one of the harder characters to get right.

First of all, to play a good Spy, you need to have a good understanding of the roles of all the classes, and how people play them most of the time. You need to understand this both so you can walk amongst your enemies while cloaking, but also so you can predict their movement and eventually take them out without it leading to a suicidal move.

In an Arena match, a good Spy goes a long way. Since there’s already a limit of players, it isn’t too hard to find players out of eyesight of others and take them down. Deadringing can seriously end up confusing players. Plus it instantly drags take down the least agile of Arena favorites: the Medic. If you thought I was going to say Heavy, you haven’t spent much time playing Arena matches.

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